LESSONS FOR CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT IN THE REFURBISHMENT OF GOVERNMENT FUNDED PROJECTS – A CASE STUDY OF STATE HOUSE PROJECT (JOB 600)

ABSTRACT
Many companies engaged in construction projects often come across both formal and informal lessons which are often poorly coordinated or documented with regards to the effort to obtain lessons learned for construction management and dissemination as well as their usage. Recognizing such constraints necessitate discussions on key characteristics that relate to lessons learned for construction management of projects. This research work was carried out to investigate the lessons learned for construction management in the refurbishment of Government funded building projects, using the Conversion of the State House Building into Offices for the Parliament of Ghana (PoG), popularly called Job 600, as a Case Study to allow for continuous improvement in the industry. Grounded on the literature, a questionnaire was designed containing information on the challenges in the construction management of job 600 project as well as measures to mitigate the identified challenges. A survey questionnaire was conducted among construction professionals Contractor, Sub-contractors, Consultant, Implementation Technical Committee (ITC), Ministry of Water Resources, Works and Housing (MWRWH) as Sponsor and PoG (End User) represented by their Technical Outfit (Development Office) who were purposively selected to elicit information pertaining to the study. Results indicate that funding for undertaking the project was limited and payment of contractor and Consultant delayed. Also, poor planning and inadequate preparations for project construction, incidence of poor planning towards project execution, incidence of lack of planning for facility maintenance and management, design and documentation deficiency were identified as the major challenges encountered. It is recommended that adequate project feasibility studies, adequate project initiation documentations, and effective communication among client, consultant and contractor as well as sufficient funding for project construction should largely be considered.


CHAPTER ONE 
INTRODUCTION 
1.1 BACKGROUND OF THE STUDY
In the construction industry, it is expected that projects are executed to meet expected completion time, at reduced cost, not compromising on quality and ensure that accidents are minimized (Carrillo, 2005). Therefore, the industry is required to improve continuously in its activities through continual accumulation of knowledge and experience (Doucet, 2007). Lessons learned from execution of projects together with the effective and operational re-application of existing knowledge derived from already completed project could contribute immensely to such continuous improvement which subsequently would result in better performance (Carrillo, 2004).

Dixon (1999) defined learning as the use of processes for acquiring knowledge at various levels such as individuals, groups or systems to change the organization in its operations to bring satisfaction to the stakeholders. It is therefore noted that lessons learned constitutes an essential part of organizational learning process which encourages collective learning from well done works or works that could be enhanced (Senge, 1990) and Pearn et al., 2007).

According to Ackerman et al (2003), lessons learned from previous experiences constitutes a key element of companies’ information base and therefore contributes immensely to their development. The authors further explained that effective means of knowledge management is to store, retrieve and enhance their logical assets. Consequently, Davenport et al. (1998) recommended that organization’s internal knowledge repositories of lessons learned from previous experiences should be easily accessible to the employees.

This research seeks to investigate the lessons learned for construction management in the refurbishment of Government funded building projects, using the Conversion of the State House Building into Offices for the Parliament of Ghana (PoG), popularly called Job 600, as a Case Study to allow for continuous improvement in the construction industry. 

1.2 PROBLEM STATEMENT 
Many companies who are into construction projects often come across both formal and informal lessons. Orange et al. (1999) identified that such lessons are not readily made known as there is poor coordination of retrieving lessons learned and their dissemination for effective construction management.

Fairclough (2002) attested to the fact that it is very beneficial for lessons learned to be shared but the evidence to prove that project teams utilize such lessons are uncommon. Research conducted by Orange et al. (1999) also pointed to numerous problems identified in the construction projects but lack of effective response tools to build up on previous works have made such research limited in their effective use by the Construction management industry. Ruikar et al. (2007) further indicated that problems are created when construction industry lack organizational learning.

Recognizing such constraints necessitate discussions on key characteristics in managing projects and point to the fact that lessons learned for construction management of projects should be properly recorded, managed and easily retrieved to facilitate effective improvement in future projects.

1.3 RESEARCH QUESTIONS 
The key research questions employed to facilitate the study were:



What are the challenges in the construction management of Job 600 project?

What are the possible measures adopted to address challenges in construction projects?

To what extent do measures adopted in resolving challenges of construction management applied for similar future projects?

1.4 RESEARCH AIM
The aim of this research is to outline lessons for best practices from the construction management of the Job 600 project.

1.5 OBJECTIVES
The key objectives of the research are as follows:

To identify challenges in the construction management of Job 600 project; To determine the measures taken to resolve challenges identified; and

To identify successful strategies to be adopted for similar future projects.

1.6 SIGNIFICANCE OF STUDY
Schindler and Eppler (2003) identified that although many mechanisms generated for lessons learned support the necessity to share lessons learned for continuous improvement of the industry, there is no compulsion on construction managers to strictly retrieve such information for adoption whilst managers interested in such information come to find that assess to such vital information requires beneficiaries to retrieve applicable lessons on their own. This seems to be a challenge to most project teams who are busy and thus are reluctant to do this unless influenced or stimulated to do so. It is therefore essential that lessons learned on projects are well documented and effectively disseminated for construction management.

1.7 SCOPE OF STUDY
The study was limited to the lessons learned from the refurbishment of the State House (Job 600) as a typical example of Government funded construction projects in Ghana. The study focused on assessing lessons learned for construction management in execution of the project and obtained the relevant information from the project stakeholders and construction team which comprise Contractor, Sub-contractors, Consultant, Implementation Technical Committee (ITC), Ministry of Water Resources, Works and Housing (MWRWH) as Sponsor and PoG (End User) represented by their Technical Outfit (Development Office). Even though the findings of the study were limited to the conversion of the state house tower block into offices, these could be applicable to general construction practices.

1.8 BRIEF METHODOLOGY
Research methodology describes the procedure to be followed in realizing the goals and objective of a research. Questionnaires were developed to gather information from project stakeholders and construction team which comprise Contractor, Sub-contractors, Consultant, Implementation Technical Committee (ITC), Ministry of Water Resources, Works and Housing (MWRWH) as Sponsor and PoG (End User) represented by their Technical Outfit (Development Office). Respondents were purposively selected for the study. The data collected were analysed using frequencies and mean score rankings. The results are presented in the tables and charts.


1.9 STRUCTURE OF REPORT
This research report has been structured in five chapters. Firstly, chapter one consist the introductory chapter which covered the background of study, problem statement, aim and objectives of study, research questions, significance of the study, scope of the study, brief methodology and organization of the study. The second chapter presents a detailed research on literature review in relation to the subject in general. Chapter three tackled the details of the research methods to be used such as sample size and techniques and method of data collection and analysis. Chapter four presents the data analysis and discussion of results and the final chapter covered the summary of findings, conclusions and recommendations.

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Item Type: Ghanaian Project Material  |  Attribute: 75 pages  |  Chapters: 1-5
Format: MS Word  |  Price: GH50  |  Delivery: Within 30Mins.
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